On 4 May 2012, an international agreement on the mutual recognition of trusted distributors in the supply chain was signed between the US and the EU. The agreement therefore guarantees EU economic operators advantages when exporting to the United States. They are offered discounts, the prospect of faster control and less effort in customs clearance. In return, trusted companies from the United States (stand: C-TPAT – “US Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism”) benefit from preferential conditions for imports into Community territory. Those looking for up-to-date information on the recognition of the AEO and C-TPAT security programs also find it in a document from the European Commission and U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. The mutual recognition document is available here: Frequently asked questions about C-TPAT and AEO recognition So far, many companies have not yet recognised the economic benefits of an authorisation as an AEO, given that in practice few benefits have been perceived. This is why only 5,000 European companies have applied for AEO status, even if the trend is on the rise. However, the mutual recognition of the AEO and C-TPAT should at least bring benefits to U.S.

operations. Facilitate trade with the United States. A new international agreement guarantees the mutual recognition of trusted economic operators, thus facilitating businesses` access to simplified customs formalities. Since 2008, Community undertakings have been able to apply for the status of Authorised Economic Operator (AEO). This issue is governed by Article 5a of the Customs Code (CC). An exemption is granted to authorised economic operators because of their increased confidence in customs formalities. The status shall be recognised in the other Member States. However, in order to obtain the status of authorised economic operator, an authorisation procedure must be completed. Admission to the AEO presupposes, first and foremost, that mutual recognition relates to activities related to the signing of a document of the Agreement between United States Customs and Customs (CBP) and a foreign customs administration that provides the platform for the exchange of accession information and recognizes the compatibility of each supply chain security program.

The document, referred to as the “agreement,” states that the security requirements or standards of the Foreign Industry Partnership Program and its verification procedures are consistent with or similar to those of the Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) program. . . .